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What says..

For intellectually inquisitive, naturally bright and highly motivated boys, this school is likely to feel a very natural fit. Maths a strength, set from year 8. ‘My son is in top set where they already go above and beyond the GCSE syllabus and this year they’ve taken the brightest ones to the next level still.’ School day recently rejigged to allow for new Electives programme, which involves years 7-11 spending one period a day (except Fridays) doing one of 12 activities covering service, sport, character development, STEM, language practice, academic enrichment etc. Recent push on…

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What the school says...

Reading School is recognised as one of the leading state schools in the country. It was selected as Sunday Times State School of the Year in 2010. OFSTED describes it as 'an outstanding school that enables students to reach exceptionally high standards both in their academic work and in their personal development'.

OFSTED rated our Boarding Provision in 2014 as 'Outstanding' stating 'The calibre of the boarding house staff is excellent. Their commitment, enthusiasm, motivation, morale and belief in the boarders are second to none. This means that boarders receive exceptionally high quality care that significantly enhances their personal development and well-being'.

Our students consistently achieve impressive academic results, including in 2014 88.1hieving grade A* to B at A-level; 85% going on to one of the top 30 universities; and 17% winning places at Oxford or Cambridge. Boys participate in a wide range of enrichment activities, including sports, music, drama, chess, astronomy, and public speaking. Senior boys also give back to the local community by volunteering at local primary schools and charities.

At Reading School we believe all our students have gifts and talents. We aim for all to be resilient and rise to the challenges of learning and life; to be curious and balance logic with imagination; to achieve excellence with integrity; and to value learning for its own sake and for the benefit of others.

Converted to an academy 2011.
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School associations

State boarding school

State grammar school

Sports

Rowing

What The Good Schools Guide says

Head

Since 2012, Ashley Robson BA NPQH MBA, previously deputy head since 2005. History degree from Newcastle University. First jobs at Princes Risborough School and Royal Grammar School, High Wycombe before becoming head of history, head of house and assistant headteacher at Aylesbury Grammar School. Still teaches history.

‘Building good men’ is his catchphrase, repeated by every parent we spoke to – message clearly resonating that this is ‘not just an academic school but also one where we develop character’. A big thinker, and a worthy one too – must be the first head we’ve interviewed who didn’t respond to our questions about Covid by ploughing straight into the usual diatribe about seamlessly moving online (though they did that too), instead explaining with pride and in great detail what the school...

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Please note: Independent schools frequently offer IGCSEs or other qualifications alongside or as an alternative to GCSE. The DfE does not record performance data for these exams so independent school GCSE data is frequently misleading; parents should check the results with the schools.

Who came from where

Who goes where

Special Education Needs

Interpreting catchment maps

The maps show in colour where the pupils at a school came from*. Red = most pupils to Blue = fewest.

Where the map is not coloured we have no record in the previous three years of any pupils being admitted from that location based on the options chosen.

For help and explanation of our catchment maps see: Catchment maps explained

Further reading

If there are more applicants to a school than it has places for, who gets in is determined by which applicants best fulfil the admissions criteria.

Admissions criteria are often complicated, and may change from year to year. The best source of information is usually the relevant local authority website, but once you have set your sights on a school it is a good idea to ask them how they see things panning out for the year that you are interested in.

Many schools admit children based on distance from the school or a fixed catchment area. For such schools, the cut-off distance will vary from year to year, especially if the school give priority to siblings, and the pattern will be of a central core with outliers (who will mostly be siblings). Schools that admit on the basis of academic or religious selection will have a much more scattered pattern.

*The coloured areas outlined in black are Census Output Areas. These are made up of a group of neighbouring postcodes, which accounts for their odd shapes. These provide an indication, but not a precise map, of the school’s catchment: always refer to local authority and school websites for precise information.

The 'hotter' the colour the more children have been admitted.

Children get into the school from here:

regularly
most years
quite often
infrequently
sometimes, but not in this year


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