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We have quizzed and/or visited a number of tutor agencies about whom we have received considerable feedback and talked to their clients and their tutors.  The reviews are available online to logged in subscribers.

We have divided the tutorial companies into three sections plus a postscript detailing newcomers. Please see below for an explanation of the divisions.

Section A

Those agencies reviewed in our first section actually know their tutors personally, ie they meet and interview them and keep in close touch.  We have visited all agencies in this section.

Companies reviewed in section A include:

Section B

Those tutor agencies in the second section meticulously check references, CRB* records, etc but, partly because of the size of their lists, conduct their personal interviews only over the telephone. These are usually agencies with a very large list of tutors and who cover a wide geographical area. They are dedicated and hard-working and take enormous pride in the service they offer but do not provide the face-to-face relationship offered by those in section A. Again we have visited all agencies in this section.

*please note The Criminal Records Bureau (CRB) and the Independent Safeguarding Authority (ISA) have merged into the Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS). CRB checks are now called DBS checks.

Companies reviewed in this section B include:

Section C

The third section comprises those tutor agencies which have been recommended to us by approbatory parents, whose tutors are happy, whose credentials and approach we have researched and which appear to us to do a creditable job but which we have not personally visited. In section C are both website-only agencies as well as those who offer the kind of careful, personal service described above. The postscript has brief reviews on two very new and ambitious agencies, both, again, specializing in the central/west London areas.

Tutor Agencies - Section C explains more about this type of agency. Companies reviewed in this section include:

Section D

These are online tutorial companies that offer interactive lessons over the web. Volunteer pupils have tried out a few lessons and they and their parents give their views.

A perfect fit?

No tutor agency – and no tutor – is perfect. All of them – the honest ones readily admit – can get it wrong occasionally and we have spoken to disgruntled clients from even the best of the agencies, but serious derailments are rare. All those listed in the following sections are reputable, respected and highly praised, both by those who work for them and by their clients. All seem to us to try hard to provide a blue chip service. The list does not include the names of all the agencies that have been recommended to us.

Some few companies we approached did not respond to our advances and we wonder why.

It’s a pity so many in our list – all those in section A – are based in London and the south-east. As ever, we would like to hear from parents who have used agencies of this calibre elsewhere in the country. We hope they’re out there – we need to know who they are! If you'd like to recommend a tutorial agency do contact us.

The Good Schools Guide reviews of tutorial companies are available to subscribers of this site.

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